Research Report on the Current Financing Situation

2006-10-30 14:31:54    博士教育网  
  • I.  Basic  Development  of  the  Private  Economy  in  the  Four  Regions

    I.1  Jiangsu  Province
    By  the  end  of  2000,  the  total  number  of  privately-owned  enterprises  (POEs)  in  Jiangsu  Province  reached  174,000  with  a  total  number  of  employees  of  2.342  million  and  a  registered  capital  of  RMB  94.864  billion.  In  2000,  the  private  economies  of  the  province  contributed  RMB170  billion  to  GDP,  representing  20%  of  the  total  GDP  of  the  province.  Currently,  the  total  value  of  taxes  paid  by  self-employed  businesses  (SEBs)  has  exceeded  12%  of  all  taxes  of  the  province  and  their  labour  force  accounts  for  16.7%  of  the  total  of  the  province.

    In  terms  of  industrial  structure,  NSEs  mainly  concentrate  in  the  manufacturing,  wholesale/retail  and  restaurant  sectors.  In  terms  of  regional  distribution,  47%  of  them  are  found  in  the  five  cities  of  Nanjing,  Suzhou,  Wuxi,  Changzhou  and  Zhenjiang.

    I.2  Zhejiang  Province
    Over  the  past  20  years  of  reform  and  opening  up,  Zhejiang  Province  developed  from  the  previous  agricultural  province  with  a  weak  economic  foundation  to  the  present  industrial  province  with  fairly  developed  light  industry  and  processing  industry.  Its  aggregate  economy  has  risen  from  the  12th  to  the  4th  in  China.  One  of  the  major  reasons  why  Zhejiang  has  become  the  fastest  developing  province  in  China’s  economic  development  is  its  active  promotion  of  the  development  of  SEBs.  At  present,  the  private  economy  has  become  a  major  component  of  Zhejiang  economy,  and  the  proportion  of  such  economy  is  as  high  as  80%  in  some  areas.  In  1999,  the  total  number  of  self-employed  businesses  in  Zhejiang  was  1.6444  million,  with  a  workforce  of  2.8143  million  people;  while  the  total  number  of  POEs  in  Zhejiang  was  146,400,  with  340,400  investors  and  a  workforce  of  1.5785  million  people.  The  proportion  of  total  workforce  in  the  self-employed  and  privately-run  economies  (SPEs)  was  16%  of  the  total  in  the  province.  Total  value  of  registered  capital  of  SPEs  reached  RMB120.36  billion,  exceeding  the  net  assets  of  all  state-owned  industrial  and  commercial  enterprises  in  Zhejiang  Province.  In  1999,  the  total  value  of  industrial  output  by  SPEs  amounted  to  RMB399.34  billion.  It  was  45%  of  total  value  of  industrial  output  in  the  whole  province  and  represented  a  growth  rate  of  25.8%  over  that  of  the  previous  year.

    In  terms  of  regional  distribution,  the  non-state  economy  has  changed  the  previous  echelon  form  of  development  characterised  by  faster  development  in  the  coastal  areas  and  slow  growth  in  the  inland  regions.  The  strength  of  SPEs  in  Ningbo  and  Hangzhou  has  already  caught  up  with  that  in  Wenzhou  and  Taizhou.  In  terms  of  sectoral  structure,  there  is  still  a  concentration  in  the  secondary  industry  and  the  commercial  wholesale,  retail  and  restaurant  services  of  the  tertiary  industry.

    I.3  Shanghai  Municipality
    By  the  end  of  1999,  there  were  188,800  self-employed  industrial  and  commercial  households  (SICHs)  in  Shanghai.  They  employed  a  total  workforce  of  233,800  people,  owned  a  total  capital  of  RMB1.84  billion,  and  realised  an  annual  output  value  of  RMB1.23  billion.  Meanwhile,  there  were  110,000  POEs  with  a  registered  capital  of  RMB78.06  billion,  a  workforce  of  1.163  million  people  and  an  accumulative  annual  output  of  RMB29.55  billion.  The  total  values  of  annual  output  and  sales  of  NSEs  in  Shanghai  rose  by  30%  over  that  of  the  previous  year,  representing  5%  of  the  total  GDP.  Total  taxes  paid  by  them  reached  RMB4.88  billion,  representing  11.2%  of  the  local  fiscal  revenue.  One  of  the  distinctive  characteristics  of  non-state  economic  development  in  Shanghai  is  its  large  size.  In  1999,  the  average  registered  capital  of  POEs  was  RMB  710,000,  more  than  that  in  the  other  three  provinces  (RMB  685,000  in  Zhejiang,  RMB  545,000  in  Jiangsu  and  RMB  428,000  in  Shandong).  As  importance  was  attached  to  SPEs  by  all  district  governments,  their  development  tended  to  become  balanced  between  city  districts  and  suburban  counties,  which  corrected  the  previously  imbalanced  development  concentrated  in  suburban  counties.  In  terms  of  industrial  structure,  more  and  more  POEs  are  engaged  in  manufacturing  and  technology  industries.  The  number  of  those  involved  in  the  primary  and  secondary  industries  rose  rapidly  and  the  rate  of  growth  exceeded  that  in  the  tertiary  industry.

    I.4  Shandong  Province
    In  1999,  the  total  number  of  SICHs  and  POEs  in  Shandong  Province  was  2.995  million  which  employed  a  total  workforce  of  6.718  million,  owned  a  total  registered  capital  of  RMB23.09  billion,  produced  a  total  output  of  RMB68.36  billion  and  paid  a  total  tax  of  RMB5.55  billion,  representing  13.7%  of  local  fiscal  revenue  of  the  province.

    Based  on  our  survey,  the  NES  has  turned  out  to  be  the  most  active  and  the  fastest  developing  sector  in  the  regions.  Since  1997,  the  economic  growth  pulling  role  of  the  state-owned  enterprise  (SOEs)  has  obviously  weakened  as  a  result  of  asset  restructuring,  labour  reduction  and  product-structure  adjustment  in  a  large  number  of  SOEs.  In  contrast,  China’s  NES  has  developed  rapidly  and  become  a  vital  force  in  sustaining  growth  of  the  national  economy.  In  1999,  the  growth  rate  of  tax  revenue  paid  by  SEBs  in  Shanghai  was  20  percentage  points  higher  than  that  of  the  whole  municipality.  In  Jiangsu,  the  average  annual  growth  of  taxes  paid  by  SPEs  per  annual  reached  32%  over  the  past  few  years.  In  Shandong  Province,  the  proportion  of  taxes  paid  by  SPEs  to  the  provincial  fiscal  revenue  rose  from  11.5%  in  1996  to  13.7%.  In  particular,  while  SOEs  laid  off  a  large  number  of  workers  and  were  generally  incapable  of  absorbing  any  new  labour  force,  the  NES  served  as  an  important  channel  to  absorb  the  laid-off  workers  and  lighten  employment  pressure.  By  the  end  of  1999,  SEBs  in  Shanghai  and  Jiangsu  recruited  an  accumulative  of  228,000  and  over  500,000  laid-off  workers  respectively.  During  1998-1999,  Shandong  Province  re-employed  280,000  laid-off  workers.  The  picture  in  the  four  regions  demonstrates  that  the  NES  has  played  an  important  role  in  promoting  market  competition,  improving  commodity  supply  and  services,  facilitating  commercialisation  of  science  and  technology  results  and  co-ordinating  state-owned  enterprise  reform.

    II.  Main  Measures  Adopted  by  Local  Governments  to  Promote  Development  of  the  NES

    As  the  NES  is  playing  an  increasingly  important  role  in  economic  growth  and  system  reform,  local  governments  have  strengthened  their  support  to  the  NES  over  the  past  few  years.  In  particular,  they  have  formulated  certain  policies  to  solve  financing  difficulty  of  NSEs.  Such  supportive  policies  mainly  cover  three  aspects.

    II.1  Establishing  Guaranty  Agencies
    To  support  the  development  of  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises  (SMEs),  under  the  enthusiastic  advocation  of  relevant  departments  of  the  Central  Government,  local  governments  at  all  levels  are  focusing  their  effort  on  setting  up  credit  guarantee  agencies  for  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises.  Such  guarantee  agencies  are  regarded  as  a  breakthrough  point  for  solving  the  problem  of  financing  difficulty.  For  example,  except  in  specific  cities,  all  the  13  cities  under  the  direct  jurisdiction  of  Jiangsu  Province  have  set  up  credit  guarantee  agencies  for  SMEs.  There  are  14  such  agencies  in  the  whole  province,  holding  a  total  value  of  RMB  400  million  in  registered  capital.  In  2000,  they  issued  letters  of  guarantee  to  over  200  enterprises,  with  an  accumulative  number  of  over  1800  and  a  total  value  of  RMB  2.5  billion.  Based  on  incomplete  statistics,  by  September  2000,  over  50  guarantee  agencies  were  set  up  in  the  cities,  counties  (districts)  and  townships  in  Zhejiang  Province.  They  owned  a  total  value  of  RMB  218  million  in  registered  capital  and  issued  over  1490  guarantees  with  a  total  value  of  RMB  771  million  in  favor  of  over  1,000  enterprises.  At  present,  Jiangsu,  Zhejiang  and  Shandong  Provinces  are  actively  engaged  in  preparation  to  establish  provincial  guarantee  agencies.  Shanghai  Municipality  has  adjusted  its  public  finance  budgeting  system  and  established  credit  guarantee  agencies  for  SMEs  supported  mainly  by  the  municipal  treasury  with  the  balance  shared  by  all  levels  of  public  finance.  By  the  end  of  2000,  this  guarantee  system  has  issued  guarantee  for  1,833  projects  with  a  total  value  of  RMB2.28  billion.

    II.2  Improving  Financing  Environment  for  NSEs
    Over  the  past  few  years,  in  order  to  improve  the  financing  environment  for  NSEs,  effort  has  been  made  by  the  governments  of  the  four  regions  in  the  following  aspects:

    First,  strengthening  contact  and  cooperation  with  banks.  In  order  to  support  the  development  of  privately-owned  SMEs,  relevant  provincial  and  municipal  departments  of  Jiangsu  and  Zhejiang  have  signed  lending  co-operation  agreements  with  the  Agricultural  Bank  of  China,  the  Industrial  and  Commercial  Bank  of  China  and  Minsheng  Banking  Corporation,  on  financing  issues  of  SEBs.  They  have  also  maintained  frequent  contact  with  the  banks  to  exchange  views  and  analyse  market  changes  and  operational  status  of  typical  enterprises,  and  co-ordinated  with  the  banks  in  their  field  studies  on  NSEs.

    Second,  solving  actual  problems  for  small  and  medium-sized  NSEs  in  the  course  of  getting  loans.  For  example,  the  provincial  government  of  Zhejiang  Province  has  issued  several  specific  policies  to  help  such  enterprises  solve  the  problems  of  multiple  registration,  multiple  charges  and  repeated  assessment  for  real  estate  mortgage  in  the  borrowing  process.  The  Government  of  Hangzhou  City  specified  policies  for  NSEs  to  acquire  public  land  assets,  which  has  improved  the  financing  environment  for  numerous  township  enterprises  after  their  system  reform.

    Third,  establishing  special  agencies  to  provide  services  to  SMEs.  In  order  to  support  these  enterprises  in  an  active  way,  the  Shanghai  municipal  government  has  established  a  financial  accounting  management  centre  and  a  SME  service  centre  to  provide  them  with  information,  consultancy  and  management  services.  Meanwhile,  in  order  to  fundamentally  relieve  financing  stress  from  SMEs  and  put  the  market  in  order,  the  Shanghai  municipal  government  plans  to  establish  a  standard  credit  rating  agency  and  a  credit  system  for  small  and  medium-sized  enterprise  within  3-5  years.

    II.3  Setting  up  Venture  Investment  Fund
    In  order  to  promote  the  development  of  small  and  medium-sized  science  and  technology  enterprises,  many  local  governments  have  set  up  venture  investment  funds  and  venture  investment  companies.  For  example,  Jiangsu  Province  has  established  a  venture  investment  company  with  provincial  government  finance  and  started  market  trial  operation,  and  major  cities  of  the  province  also  followed  suit.  The  government  of  Zhejiang  Province  supported  the  establishment  of  three  venture  investment  companies  and  some  of  its  city  governments  also  set  up  renovation  funds  for  SMEs.  In  Shanghai,  the  municipal  government  has  built  up  a  venture  investment  system,  which  includes  certain  specialised  agencies  such  as  Shanghai  Chuangye  Investment  Company,  Shanghai  Science  and  Technology  Investment  Company,  Shanghai  Lianchuang  Investment  Management  Company  and  Shanghai  Technology  Property  Right  Exchange.  By  the  beginning  of  2001,  the  total  value  of  venture  investment  funds  raised  by  Shanghai  Municipality  exceeded  RMB  5  billion,  while  more  than  40  various  venture  investment  and  management  companies  came  into  being.

    III.  Financing  Status  and  Problems  of  the  Private  Economy

    In  general,  with  efforts  made  by  all  areas  concerned,  financing  difficulty  encountered  by  NSEs  has  been  relieved  to  some  extent.  However,  the  problem  has  not  been  solved  fundamentally.  Based  on  statistics  of  Shanghai  (Trade  and  Development)  Service  Centre  for  Small  Enterprises,  after  a  year  of  its  establishment,  80%  of  its  clients  demanded  financial  assistance.  In  Jiangsu  Province,  the  proportion  of  the  outstanding  balance  of  loans  to  SPEs  in  1999  only  took  up  4.8%  of  the  total.  Although  there  was  a  small  increase  in  2000,  it  only  reached  5.2%.  In  Zhejiang  Province,  the  proportion  of  total  lending  by  all  commercial  banks  to  township  and  privately-owned  enterprises  only  took  6.5%  of  the  total  in  2000.  The  proportion  of  lending  by  urban  commercial  banks  was  slightly  higher  at  8.2%.  In  Wuxi  City  of  Jiangsu  Province,  there  were  6700  new  POEs  in  2000  with  a  total  registered  capital  of  RMB5.024  billion.  However,  new  credit  funds  for  them  was  only  RMB54  million.  There  were  20  POEs  with  excellent  performance  that  took  part  in  the  bank-enterprise  co-operation  project,  but  only  three  of  them  obtained  loans,  totalling  RMB7  million.  Obviously,  this  situation  is  tremendously  out  of  line  with  the  status  of  NES  in  the  two  provinces  of  Jiangsu  and  Zhejiang.  

    III.1  Banks  Generally  Compete  for  Large  Enterprises  and  Reluct  to  give  loans  to  Small  Ones.
    Although  the  credit  policy  of  the  Central  Bank  encourages  commercial  banks  to  increase  lending  to  SMEs,  for  safety  considerations,  however,  all  commercial  banks  compete  for  large  clients  and  reluct  to  lend  to  small  borrowers.  This  has  created  a  situation  where  more  than  sufficient  funds  are  made  available  to  the  large  enterprises,  whereas  the  small  ones  are  unable  to  have  financial  support  enough  to  get  out  of  the  corner.  The  consequence  is  capital  abundance  of  both  banks  and  large  enterprises,  resulting  in  significant  increase  in  enterprise  savings  and  loans  flowing  to  consumption  and  stock  market.  Take  Wuxi  city  for  example,  enterprise  savings  last  year  increased  by  about  17%,  representing  52.5%  of  increased  savings.  Meanwhile,  short-term  lending  by  banks  for  housing  and  consumption  increased  by  38.3%,  making  up  51.9%  of  the  total  increase.  In  contrast,  lending  to  industries  only  increased  by  6.1%,  remarkably  lower  than  the  14.4%  growth  rate  of  industrial  output.  In  addition,  bill  acceptance  business  has  developed  rapidly  over  the  past  few  years,  but  it  has  also  focused  on  the  large  enterprises,  the  banks  hardly  give  any  bill  acceptance  quota  to  the  small  ones.

    III.2  Discrimination  against  Private  Ownership  System  Still  Remains  in  Various  Degree.
    Except  in  Zhejiang  Province  where  the  NES  is  universally  accepted  for  the  sake  of  its  particular  historical  and  cultural  background,  we  found  in  those  places  of  our  study  various  degrees  of  discrimination  against  SEBs.  With  the  long-term  influence  of  the  planned  economy  and  traditional  ideology,  financial  departments  generally  tend  to  "be  afraid  of"  private  ownership.  Some  localities  reported  that,  for  the  same  amount  of  a  bank  loan,  if  it  was  defaulted  by  a  SOE,  the  bank  staff  may  be  free  from  any  responsibility,  but  if  it  was  defaulted  by  a  POE,  the  bank  staff  may  be  investigated  for  responsibilities  by  the  judicial  organ.  For  the  fear  of  the  lending  responsibility,  the  credit  personnel  acted  very  prudently  in  specific  operations,  which  is  featured  in  restrained  loans,  complicated  procedures,  harsh  mortgage  terms,  overly  strict  requirements  on  mortgages  and  extremely  low  mortgage  rate.  Some  POEs  said  that  they  usually  had  to  spend  a  half  year’s  time  obtaining  a  loan,  thus  having  missed  lots  of  business  opportunities.  With  RMB550  million  of  its  own  capital  and  RMB1  billion  of  annual  sales,  Zhongda  Industrial  Group  in  Jiangsu  Province  was  awarded  the  title  of  Excellent  Enterprise  by  the  Agricultural  Bank  of  China  Head  Office  and  was  granted  a  loan  quota  of  RMB50  million.  In  practice,  however,  the  business  department  of  the  Agricultural  Bank  of  China  only  allowed  a  loan  of  RMB30  million  to  Zhongda  Group.

    III.3  Guarantee  Companies  and  Various  Funds  Are  Utterly  Inadequate.
    At  present,  there  are  over  340,000  SEBs  in  Shanghai.  In  the  past  two  years,  however,  only  over  2000  enterprises  (including  state-owned  and  shareholding  enterprises)  received  financial  services  from  the  Shanghai  Branch  of  China  Investment  Guarantee  Company,  the  Technology  Exchange,  the  venture  investment  companies  and  all  kinds  of  district-and  county-level  guarantee  funds.  By  the  beginning  of  2000,  the  proportion  of  financing  loans  obtained  in  all  forms  of  guarantee  only  made  up  around  5%  in  Shanghai,  of  which  loans  to  small  enterprises  merely  took  up  30%.  In  other  words,  loans  obtained  by  small  enterprises  through  the  guarantee  channel  only  accounted  for  1.5%.  In  Zhejiang  Province,  despite  a  large  number  of  guarantee  agencies,  most  of  them  only  have  a  registered  capital  ranging  from  RMB  3  to  5  million.  Take  the  total  registered  capital  as  RMB  218  million  and  multiply  it  by  five,  it  could  only  produce  a  guarantee  capacity  of  RMB  1  billion,  merely  1.1%  of  new  loans  in  2000  in  the  province.  In  Wuxi  City,  Jiangsu  Province,  the  registered  capital  of  the  30,000  POEs  was  RMB  17.8  billion.  If  matched  on  a  1:1  basis,  the  working  capital  shortage  would  aggregate  RMB  12  billion.  However,  the  aggregate  capacity  of  the  guarantee  agencies  in  the  province  was  less  than  RMB  1.5  billion.  Moreover,  as  generally  reported  by  all  localities,  the  guarantee  funds  are  operating  on  thin  ice  because  they  cannot  prevent  risks  for  themselves.  They  have  to  meet  too  strict  qualification  appraisal  and  counter-guarantee  requirements,  and  go  through  very  complicated  procedures,  which  not  only  add  burden  to  enterprises  but  also  let  slip  business  opportunities.

    III.4  Maturity  Schedule  of  B

免责声明:本站文章均由网上收集,所有文章仅供学习参考之用,版权和著作权归原作者所有,请在24小时内删除! 如果您发现侵犯您的权益,请即时通知,本站将立即删除!

推荐文章